Receiving The COVID-19 Vaccine and Its Correlation with Post COVID-19 Long Term Morbidity

Authors

  • Ahmed Mahdi Dawah University of Sousse, Faculty of Medicine Ibn Al Jazar, Sousse, Tunisia
  • Meriam Ghardallou University of Sousse, Faculty of Medicine Ibn Al Jazar, Sousse, Tunisia
  • Buthaina A Rashid Collage of Health and Medical Technologies, Middle Technical University, Iraq

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.55489/njcm.150620243881

Keywords:

Post COVID-19 condition, COVID 19, COVID19 vaccine, Vaccine & post COVID-19 long-term morbidity

Abstract

Back ground: Long-coronavirus disease is the long-term consequences of COVID-19 infection experienced by individuals who are infected with the virus. Signs, symptoms, and problems that persist or worsen following an acute COVID-19 infection are collectively referred to as long COVID. This study tries to determine the correlation between vaccination status and the post-COVID long-term effects in vaccinated versus non-vaccinated infected individuals.

Methodology: It was a cross-sectional descriptive design, encompassing 416 individuals. Study cases represented vaccinated individuals who were infected and were suffering from the long-term consequences of COVID-19, as opposed to non-vaccinated infected individuals. Individuals who were neither infected, vaccinated, or unvaccinated considered as a reference group for estimating the correlation utilizing Odds ratio (OR).

Result: This study revealed that vaccinated individuals were more commonly affected by weakness (OR= 0.93; 95% CI 0.49-1.7), joint pain (OR= 0.7; 95% CI 0.41-1.4), and concentration problems (OR= 0.87; 95% CI 0.44-1.7) so that present study didn’t notify significant statistical findings for post-COVID conditions risks regarding to vaccination status.

Conclusion: The correlation between vaccinated and non-vaccinated individuals who develop post-COVID-19 conditions showed that risk factors for developing these conditions were independently associated with vaccination status among infected participants.

References

Yuki K, Fujiogi M, Koutsogiannaki S. COVID-19 pathophysiology: A review. Clinical immunology. 2020 Jun 1;215:108427. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clim.2020.108427 PMid:32325252 PMCid:PMC7169933

Fernández-de-las-Peñas C, Notarte KI, Peligro PJ, Velasco JV, Ocampo MJ, Henry BM, et al. Long-covid symptoms in individuals infected with different SARS-COV-2 variants of concern: A systematic review of the literature. Viruses. 2022 Nov 25;14(12):2629. Doi: https://doi.org/10.3390/v14122629 PMid:36560633 PMCid:PMC9785120

Post covid-19 condition [Internet]. World Health Organization; [cited 2024 Apr 3]. Available from: https://www.who.int/teams/health-care-readiness/post-covid-19-condition.

Montani D, Savale L, Noel N, Meyrignac O, Colle R, Gasnier M, et al. Post-acute COVID-19 syndrome. European Respiratory Review. 2022 Mar 9;31(163):210185. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1183/16000617.0185-2021 PMid:35264409 PMCid:PMC8924706

Hayes LD, Ingram J, Sculthorpe NF. More than 100 persistent symptoms of SARS-COV-2 (long COVID): A scoping review. Frontiers in Medicine. 2021 Nov 1;8. Doi: https://doi.org/10.3389/fmed.2021.750378 PMid:34790680 PMCid:PMC8591053

Widdifield J, Kwong JC, Chen S, Eder L, Benchimol EI, Kaplan GG, et al. Vaccine effectiveness against SARS-COV-2 infection and severe outcomes among individuals with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases tested between March 1 and Nov 22, 2021, in Ontario, Canada: A population-based analysis. The Lancet Rheumatology. 2022 Jun;4(6). Doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/S2665-9913(22)00096-0 PMid:35441151

van Kessel SA, Olde Hartman TC, Lucassen PL, van Jaarsveld CH. Post-acute and long-COVID-19 symptoms in patients with mild diseases: A systematic review. Family Practice. 2021 Jul 16;39(1):159-67. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1093/fampra/cmab076 PMid:34268556 PMCid:PMC8414057

Graham F. Daily briefing: What we know about vaccines and long COVID [Internet]. Nature Publishing Group; 2021 [cited 2024 Apr 3]. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1038/d41586-021-03531-1

Notarte KI, Catahay JA, Velasco JV, Pastrana A, Ver AT, Pangilinan FC, et al. Impact of covid-19 vaccination on the risk of developing long-COVID and on existing long-COVID symptoms: A systematic review. eClinicalMedicine. 2022 Nov;53:101624. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eclinm.2022.101624 PMid:36051247 PMCid:PMC9417563

Fernández-de-las-Peñas C, Ortega-Santiago R, Fuensalida-Novo S, Martín-Guerrero JD, Pellicer-Valero OJ, Torres-Macho J. Differences in long-covid symptoms between vaccinated and non-vaccinated (BNT162b2 vaccine) hospitalized COVID-19 survivors infected with the Delta variant. Vaccines. 2022 Sept 6;10(9):1481. Doi: https://doi.org/10.3390/vaccines10091481 PMid:36146560 PMCid:PMC9504977

Wisnivesky JP, Govindarajulu U, Bagiella E, Goswami R, Kale M, Campbell KN, et al. Association of vaccination with the persistence of post-covid symptoms. Journal of General Internal Medicine. 2022 Mar 9;37(7):1748-53. Doi: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11606-022-07465-w PMid:35266128 PMCid:PMC8906626

Downloads

Published

2024-06-01

How to Cite

1.
Dawah AM, Ghardallou M, Buthaina A Rashid. Receiving The COVID-19 Vaccine and Its Correlation with Post COVID-19 Long Term Morbidity. Natl J Community Med [Internet]. 2024 Jun. 1 [cited 2024 Jun. 23];15(06):479-82. Available from: https://njcmindia.com/index.php/file/article/view/3881

Issue

Section

Short Research Article