Magnitude Of Undernutrition in Urban and Rural School-Going Children of District Dehradun Using Who Reference Standards

Authors

  • Madhavi Bhargava Yenepoya Medical College, Mangalore
  • Pradeep Aggarwal Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences, Swami Rama Himalayan University, Dehradun
  • Sunil D Kandpal Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences, Swami Rama Himalayan University, Dehradun
  • Jayanti Semwal Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences, Swami Rama Himalayan University, Dehradun

Keywords:

Undernutrition, School-going Children, Anthropometry, AnthroPlus Software

Abstract

Background: Anthropometry is an inexpensive and non-invasive method of growth and nutritional assessment. The objective of the study was to estimate the prevalence of undernutrition among school-going children belonging to urban and rural area of District Dehradun using WHO standards.

Methods: Nutritional assessment of school-going children was done in urban and rural areas using standard anthropometric measure- ments of height and weight. A total of 1808 school children were enrolled from 5-19 years of age. Weight-for-age, height-for-age and BMI-for-age z-scores were calculated using WHO AnthroPlus Soft- ware.

Results: The prevalence of underweight (<-2SD) was 8% in urban as compared to 23% in rural children. The prevalence of stunting and thinness was 14.8% and 6.1% in urban children and 16.6% and 25.9% in rural children. There were 14% urban children and 10% rural children who were overweight.

Conclusion: Undernutrition remains an ongoing health problem in school going children. WHO AnthroPlus Software can be a very use- ful for analysis of state and national level.

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Published

2015-12-31

How to Cite

1.
Bhargava M, Aggarwal P, Kandpal SD, Semwal J. Magnitude Of Undernutrition in Urban and Rural School-Going Children of District Dehradun Using Who Reference Standards. Natl J Community Med [Internet]. 2015 Dec. 31 [cited 2024 May 29];6(04):452-7. Available from: https://njcmindia.com/index.php/file/article/view/1239

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Original Research Articles